Happy publication day for Timekeepers

Today is publication day for Timekeepers from Dave Weaver.
Time travel, Romans, action & adventure and a scary AI.
A perfect read for a snowy weekend!
Get it today from all the best eBook retailers, and others too…
bit.ly/Timekeepers-KindleUK
bit.ly/Timekeepers-iTunes
bit.ly/Timekeepers-Kobo
bit.ly/Timekeepers-Google

Artwork by Alison Buck

Beware ancient coins, they’re not always what they seem – warns Dave Weaver, author of Timekeepers

When loner Jack Johnson touches an old coin he suddenly finds himself transported back to a distant and perilous past; then forwards to a dark, dystopian future where rebels struggle to overturn an ancient and ruthlessly oppressive empire.

DARTFORD, KENT – 14 February 2018 – Elsewhen Press, an independent UK publisher specialising in Speculative Fiction, is delighted to announce the publication of Timekeepers by Dave Weaver, a new twist on a time travelling adventure.

Artwork by Alison Buck
Artwork by Alison Buck

Jack Johnson has an exceptional gift: a remarkable ability to absorb and memorise facts instantly and without effort. A lonely teenager, he has had little control over his life, having to leave behind friends and everything familiar, in the move to a new town, a new school, a new start. Jack misses his old life. He knows that his immediate future will not be easy – his astonishing memory has not always helped win him friends – but he can never have anticipated the incredible events that are about to befall him. Discovering what appears to be an ancient coin, Jack finds himself abruptly hurled back and then forward through time, by a technology and an intelligence beyond his control. Jack’s extraordinary memory, and his fascination with history, are to prove vital as he is thrown back across the centuries, to the early years of the Roman occupation of Britain, then forward to the heart of a vastly powerful totalitarian state. In both past and future, manipulated by opposing factions, Jack’s life is under constant threat. He will need all his ability and courage to survive. Whom can he trust? Can he save those he cares for? Will he ever return home?

Continue reading “Beware ancient coins, they’re not always what they seem – warns Dave Weaver, author of Timekeepers”

The Unseen by Dave Weaver now available in paperback

Artwork by Alison Buck; Cottage photograph by 1000 Words/shutterstock.com
Artwork by Alison Buck; Cottage photograph by 1000 Words/shutterstock.com

Dave Weaver’s latest novel The Unseen, which has been available as an eBook since Friday the 13th May, is now available in paperback.

In a recent review on RisingShadow, Seregil of Rhiminee said “The Unseen has a touch of British coolness that separates it from other horror novels. Although it’s partly a traditional supernatural story, it has freshness that makes it different and entertaining.”

The Unseen will be available to buy or order in paperback through all good retailers and direct from Elsewhen Press.

“Intriguing horror entertainment!” – review of The Unseen on RisingShadow

Artwork by Alison Buck; Cottage photograph by 1000 Words/shutterstock.com
Artwork by Alison Buck; Cottage photograph by 1000 Words/shutterstock.com

On RisingShadow.net, Seregil of Rhiminee has posted a review of The Unseen, the latest novel from Dave Weaver. Seregil admits that he is a big fan of horror and starts by saying that The Unseen is a welcome addition to paranormal horror fiction. He says that it’s “an entertaining and intriguing novel, because it’s simultaneously a horror story and a paranormal thriller with elements of psychological horror.” He comments that “The Unseen has a touch of British coolness that separates it from other horror novels. Although it’s partly a traditional supernatural story, it has freshness that makes it different and entertaining.” He observes that The Unseen “has a surprise ending that suddenly steers the story into a new direction” which is “an intriguing twist that will thrill readers”, adding that he thinks “it’s good that the author has not settled for an ordinary ending, but has thought of something different”.

Describing Dave Weaver as a “versatile and talented author who has written interesting speculative fiction novels” Seregil says that, in The Unseen, Dave “easily creates a strange atmosphere that is filled with supernatural menace”. He has “created a fully three-dimensional protagonist in John Mason” and the supporting characters are “interesting and well-created”. One of the reasons why John is such an interesting protagonist is that “he is not perfect and has made mistakes. He is tormented by his past and has feelings of guilt. He has problems with alcohol, but he has gotten treatment for it”. Once he moves into his new cottage in Hambleford, John comes to believe that it is haunted by Evangeline Foret, a young girl who was found hanged in nearby woods almost 100 years ago. Seregil compliments Dave on creating “an intense, strange and hallucinatory atmosphere by gradually revealing what happens to John and what he finds out about the past events related to Evangeline”. He says that Dave “effectively infuses the story with dark eroticism and feelings of guilt” which “adds plenty of depth and punch to the story” and about which Dave “writes well”.

Seregil enjoyed reading The Unseen and says he’d “like to see Dave Weaver write more this kind of fiction, because he has potential to become a thrilling horror author. He has all the necessary talents to break out into the genre and cause amazement with his fiction.” He concludes by recommending The Unseen as an excellent novel for anyone looking for an entertaining and gripping story, that keeps you intrigued by various twists and turns and surprises you with its ending.

You can read Seregil’s full review here.

 

“brilliant gathering of short fiction” – review of Existence is Elsewhen in Aurealis magazine

Artwork by Alison Buck
Artwork by Alison Buck

In the latest issue (#90) of Aurealis magazine, Robbie Colburn has written a review of Existence is Elsewhen. Although Aurealis is primarily a magazine about Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy they recognise the global nature of SF; and, of course, the line-up of authors in Existence is Elsewhen is itself distinctly global. Sydney-based author Steve Harrison’s satirical Earthsale was one of the stories that Robbie liked, but he also singled out Tej Turner’s The Last Days, Stefan Jackson’s Luceria and Dave Weaver’s The Copy. He complimented the diversity of the stories included in what he described as a “generous bumper collection of speculative writing”.

Aurealis #90 available from www.aurealis.com.au

You should read all of Robbie’s review in issue #90 of Aurealis – and while you’re at it read the rest of the magazine too which also includes original short stories. You can get Aurealis here.

 

Friday the 13th – The Unseen is here

It’s Friday the 13th.

The Unseen is now here.

Are you brave enough to read it?

Today?

Artwork by Alison Buck; Cottage photograph by 1000 Words/shutterstock.com
Artwork by Alison Buck; Cottage photograph by 1000 Words/shutterstock.com

The latest novel from Dave Weaver is a disturbing paranormal story set in idyllic Essex countryside

What if the cottage of your dreams turns out to be a house from hell? The Unseen is a darkly erotic tale of guilt and obsession – hallucinatory and horrifying, with a shocking finale.

DARTFORD, KENT – 12 April 2016 – Elsewhen Press, an independent UK publisher specialising in Speculative Fiction, is delighted to announce a deal signed with author Dave Weaver for his latest novel The Unseen.

Dave Weaver is not constrained within any single genre. His previous work has encompassed YA fantasy and futuristic science fiction, but his latest novel has more in common with his 2014 paranormal journey through Japanese culture, Japanese Daisy Chain. This time, however, the story unfolds in an apparently idyllic cottage in a little village tucked away in the heart of Essex. But even within this novel, Dave does not feel obliged to limit himself: a paranormal story, yes, but with elements of a crime novel and a dark passionate thriller.

Artwork by Alison Buck; Cottage photograph by 1000 Words/shutterstock.com
Artwork by Alison Buck; Cottage photograph by 1000 Words/shutterstock.com

Ex-advertising man John Mason is driving to the small town of Hambleford to view a cottage that is for sale, when he is caught in a sudden hailstorm. It brings back memories of the crash a year before in which he lost his wife Judith; a crash caused by a woman in white standing in the middle of the road – a woman who was nowhere to be found after the accident. As the hailstorm lashes his car he has a vision of her, with empty eyes and a silent screaming mouth. John had been having regular dreams about her ever since the crash, but lately they have been replaced by dreams of an idyllic cottage on a hillside like the one in which Judith had wanted them to live. John is special – he sees things that others can’t. Since childhood he’s had strange experiences but has tried to shut them out; now he thinks Judith is trying to contact him, that she’s been sending his mind images of the house where her spirit will join him again, and that Pine Cottage in Hambleford is literally the cottage of his dreams. But things aren’t all as they appear and John quickly becomes convinced that a spirit other than Judith is trying to manipulate him.

Available from Elsewhen Press on popular eBook platforms in May, The Unseen will be published in August in a paperback edition.

Notes for Editors

About Dave Weaver

Dave WeaverA graphic designer by day, Dave has been writing by night for over a decade. With numerous short stories published in anthologies and webzines, he has had three novels published by Elsewhen Press – Jacey’s Kingdom (2013), Japanese Daisy Chain (2014) and The Black Hole Bar (2014). He is a big fan of science fiction, and has written many futuristic tales. But much of his writing also hovers on the shifting borders between fantasy and reality, a world of glimpsed ghosts and shadows, unspoken secrets, demons from the past and uncertain visions of the future.

 

“a sharp collection” – 8/10 review of Existence is Elsewhen on Starbust Magazine

Artwork by Alison Buck
Artwork by Alison Buck

Tommy James has just written a review of Existence is Elsewhen for Starburst Magazine. Describing it as a “sharp collection” of short stories, Tommy writes that Existence is Elsewhen presents an “eclectic range of ideas” producing an end result that is “extremely well written” and “rich with a wide variety of material”. That variety is shown in the choice of tones of the stories with some “genuinely amusing pieces which nicely punctuate the darker stories”, while singling out Douglas Thompson’s Bird Brains as a “provocative tale whose ideas will manifest themselves long after you’ve finished reading”.

Tommy concludes that Existence is Elsewhen is a “smartly presented collection” that anyone who enjoys short fiction “would be well advised to familiarise themselves with”, awarding it 8 out of 10 stars.

You can read Tommy’s full review on the Starburst Magazine website here.

 

Existence is Elsewhen launch at Mancunicon

Artwork by Alison Buck
Artwork by Alison Buck

Over the Easter weekend, the Manchester Hilton Deansgate was taken over by Eastercon (known this year as Mancunicon). Among the various panels and events was our launch of Existence is Elsewhen. Of the twenty authors of stories in this (excellent and wonderfully imaginative) anthology, nine were at Mancunicon, along with Alison who designed the cover and the fleurons inside the book. We held a launch party in the Presidential Suite on the 22nd floor.



View from 22nd floor at launch of Existence is Elsewhen just before sunset
View from 22nd floor at launch of Existence is Elsewhen just before sunset

We were supposed to start at sunset, but got underway a little late – but we still had good views out over the city. Each of the authors present read a short extract from their own story – just enough to whet the appetite of the audience who were very attentive, in spite of (or perhaps thanks to) the wine and beer that was also being consumed. And of course there were flying saucers to be eaten as well as small chocolate eggs.

View from the 22nd floor at the Launch of Existence is Elsewhen after sunset
View from the 22nd floor at the Launch of Existence is Elsewhen after sunset


Pete started with an introduction and then read Christopher Nuttall’s extract from The Girl in Black for him, as Christopher was busy soothing his one-year old who had just decided he didn’t like the room being so full.

Pete reading from Christopher Nuttall's The Girl in Black at the Existence is Elsewhen launch (while Christopher was busy trying to soothe his one-year old son outside the room!)
Pete reading from Christopher Nuttall’s The Girl in Black at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
(while Christopher was busy trying to soothe his one-year old son outside the room!)


Siobhan McVeigh read from her story Face the Music:

Siobhan McVeigh reading from Face the Music at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Siobhan McVeigh reading from Face the Music at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Susan Oke read from her story Hide and Hunt:

Susan Oke reading from Hide and Hunt at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Susan Oke reading from Hide and Hunt at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Peter R. Ellis read from his story In the bleak Long Winter:

Peter R. Ellis reading from In the bleak Long Winter at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Peter R. Ellis reading from In the bleak Long Winter at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Dave Weaver read from his story The Copy:

Dave Weaver reading from The Copy at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Dave Weaver reading from The Copy at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


J.A. Christy read from her story Inside and Out™ V.5:

J.A. Christy reading from Inside and Out™ V.5 at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
J.A. Christy reading from Inside and Out™ V.5 at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Tej Turner read from his story The Last Days:

Tej Turner reading from The Last Days at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Tej Turner reading from The Last Days at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Edwin Hayward read from his story Ambrosia:

Edwin Hayward reading from Ambrosia at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Edwin Hayward reading from Ambrosia at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Andy McKell read from his story Homo Sapiens Inferior:

Andy McKell reading from Homo Sapiens Inferior at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Andy McKell reading from Homo Sapiens Inferior at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Everybody had a good time, authors and audience alike. It was a very pleasant start to Saturday evening!

 

“excellent and wonderfully imaginative” – review of Existence is Elsewhen on Risingshadow

Artwork by Alison Buck
Artwork by Alison Buck

On Risingshadow.net Seregil of Rhiminee has just reviewed Existence is Elsewhen. He starts by saying that as an anthology it “wonderfully showcases” what Elsewhen Press has to offer and is “something special and mesmerising”. He especially liked the fact that there was a wide variety of stories “that highlight the imagination and writing skills of various authors” ranging from “entertaining stories to thought-provoking stories” with a diversity from “colonising new planets to reverse evolution”. He adds that it is “an interesting anthology to those who want to read something out of the ordinary and want to be thrilled by stories that push and stretch the limits of normality and strangeness in various ways”.

He then gives a brief overview of each story, with his comments on each (all good, I’m pleased to say), followed by a slightly more detailed review of some of the stories that particularly interested him. I won’t try to summarise his detailed review in any more detail, except to say that he concludes by describing it as “a perfect anthology for readers who want to experience something different. Some of the sights and wonders explored in these stories are seldom found in modern speculative fiction, and thus make for an intriguing reading experience”. You really should read his full review here.