the Dark shall do what Light cannot released in paperback today

the Dark shall do what Light cannot, the second novel in the LiGa series by Sanem Ozdural is available from today in a paperback edition.

Artwork: Alison Buck
Artwork: Alison Buck

Following on from the critically acclaimed LiGa™, this new novel reveals more about the secretive organisation behind the life-extending technology of LiGa. Along with LiGa’s newest recruits, we are transported from New York on an eventful voyage across the high seas and beyond the Light Veil to the colourful and wonderful world of Pera, an almost-mythical place on the other side of reality. On the way we meet the pirate Patron and her ship the Flying Fish, the only one that can sail through the Light Veil; Orion (Imm.), the Hunter, respected by some and feared by others; and Shadow, the formidable soul of Pera.

There are light trees in Pera that eat sunlight and bear fruit which, in turn, lights up and energises (literally) the whole community. There are light birds that glitter in the night because they have eaten the seed of the lightberry. The House of Light and Dark, which is the domain of the Sun and her brother, Twilight, welcomes all creatures living in Pera. But in the midst of all the glitter, laughter and the songs, it must be remembered that the lightberry is poisonous to the non-Pera born, and the Land is afraid when the Sun retreats, for it is then that Twilight walks the streets…

the Dark shall do what Light cannot has been available in popular eBook formats since the 10th April.

 

Lawyer’s new novel examines rights, responsibilities and justice in a place beyond the Light Veil

As in fellow lawyer Sir Thomas More’s Utopia, Sanem Ozdural combines elements of science fiction and fantasy to provide a setting in which to consider the limitations of the power of the state, in her new novel, the Dark shall do what Light cannot.

DARTFORD, KENT – 10 April 2015 – Elsewhen Press, an independent UK publisher specialising in Speculative Fiction, is delighted to announce the publication of a new novel, the Dark shall do what Light cannot, by author and international lawyer Sanem Ozdural. Following the success of LiGa™, her critically acclaimed debut, the latest novel reveals more about the secretive organisation behind the life-extending technology of LiGa. Along with LiGa’s newest recruits, we are transported from New York on an eventful voyage across the high seas and beyond the Light Veil to the colourful and wonderful world of Pera, an almost-mythical place on the other side of reality. On the way we meet the pirate Patron and her ship the Flying Fish, the only one that can sail through the Light Veil; Orion (Imm.), the Hunter, respected by some and feared by others; and Shadow, the formidable soul of Pera.

Artwork: Alison Buck
Artwork: Alison Buck

There are light trees in Pera that eat sunlight and bear fruit which, in turn, lights up and energises (literally) the whole community. There are light birds that glitter in the night because they have eaten the seed of the lightberry. The House of Light and Dark, which is the domain of the Sun and her brother, Twilight, welcomes all creatures living in Pera. But in the midst of all the glitter, laughter and the songs, it must be remembered that the lightberry is poisonous to the non-Pera born, and the Land is afraid when the Sun retreats, for it is then that Twilight walks the streets…

As a prosecutor, Sanem has confronted some of the worst aspects of humanity. As a novelist she enables us to consider questions that we might otherwise choose to avoid. We live in a world of Light and Dark, Day and Night, Good and Evil. How do we deal with evil? Despite its power and resources, the state with all its laws and police is neither omnipotent nor omnipresent. It is not always enough.

In Pera, as in our world, there is deceit and cruelty. There are people who would harm defenceless children, and those who would jeopardise the health and wealth of their communities for personal gain. What happens, though, when the Sun is not able to shine her light into the repulsive crevices of humanity? When, with all the goodwill in the world, we cannot keep the children safe, or the forests intact. What happens when the rivers are polluted irreversibly, and we can hear the land groan: barren and toxic? And the people have lost their savings, their homes and their communities… Then… the Dark shall do what Light cannot.

Pera is fictional, a place where we can see the effect of novel attempts to deal with rights and responsibilities. But Pera is also real; it is the old name of historic Istanbul and means ‘the other side’.

the Dark shall do what Light cannot is published today by Elsewhen Press in a digital edition in all popular eBook formats. It will be published in a paperback edition in the summer.

Notes for Editors

About Sanem Ozdural

Sanem OzduralSanem Ozdural was born in Ankara, Turkey in the 70s, and spent her childhood from age seven onwards in England. Happy days at a quintessentially British boarding school in Surrey helped forge her character and tastes, not to mention lasting friendships. Making her way to the U.S. she studied economics at Princeton University. After graduating from Boston University School of Law, she moved to New Orleans where she practiced as a prosecutor and civil litigator, and spent seven wonderful years living in the French Quarter.

In 2004 she migrated from New Orleans via Washington, D.C., reaching New York City in 2006, where she lived and practiced law until 2013. She is now teaching business law at Koç University in Istanbul. Sanem was an avid bridge player until the tenth round of revisions to her debut novel, LiGa™ which was published by Elsewhen Press in 2012. She is now thoroughly enjoying an indefinite bridge sabbatical, and has been imagining all sorts of stories that feature absolutely no bridge or chess.

 

“brings the theoretical complexities surrounding the idea of fate to life” – review of The Lost Men on The View from Here

The Lost Men CoverOn The View From Here website, Grace Read has written her review of David Colón’s novel The Lost Men.  In her witty introduction, she says she read the book while suffering from morning sickness so it may have affected her clarity of mind!  Nonetheless she says that she found it thought-provoking, placing concepts popular with philosophers into a family life setting and presenting “complex ideas about destiny in a digestible form”.

Her favourite elements of the book were the dialogue and she says she found the last part of the book “gripping”. Although she concludes by saying that The Lost Men would be “a perfect read for a philosophy student” she doesn’t suggest that it wouldn’t appeal to non-philosophers.

You can read the full review here.

Creating Worlds

Over on the savvy authors blog, Sanem Ozdural, author of LiGa™, has written about writing, and specifically the preparation and research for LiGa™.  If you want an insight into the process of being an author you can read it here.

Postcard From The Future #10

Our final postcard from the future comes from Professor Saul Deveraux himself, inventor of the Retro-Temporal acceleration technology being deployed at Geneva’s ‘Even Larger Hadron Collider’ to send messages back in time…

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I hope you’ve enjoyed the previous nine messages over the last nine months. The same time as the gestation of a human child, perhaps not coincidentally. You see, the Retro-Temporal Postcard Program is very much my baby, my lifetime’s work, albeit so well assisted by thousands of other dedicated scientists, the world over. I thank them all.

Will you people of the early twenty-first century believe that these messages are real? –That we in the 23rd century, really have mastered such incredible technology as to be able to send information back in time to you? As I write, there is no evidence in any of our libraries or history annals that these attempts were successful. But I confidently expect to go to the same data sources tomorrow and find that history has updated itself. Of course it will. But will I know? This paper I write on would have to disappear into thin air, in order for me not to know, and that seems unlikely. So history is going to change and we’re going to see it change, almost instantly before our eyes. How extraordinary. That has never happened before in the history of our planet. Or has it? You see the irony? Continue reading “Postcard From The Future #10”

“thought-provoking” – review of LiGa™ on Risingshadow

LiGa™ coverIn his review of LiGa™ by Sanem Ozdural, Finnish reviewer Seregil of Rhiminee recommends this “entertaining and well written book” to all science fiction readers, because he enjoyed it very much. He praised the way that Sanem “explored human weaknesses and strengths” making the “reader think about what it would be like to live forever and never age”. He finishes by saying that Sanem Ozdural is “an author to watch”. You can read the full review here.

LiGa™ by Sanem Ozdural featured on BookOxygen website

LiGa™ cover (click for full size)If you head over to the Book Oxygen web site (click here) you can see a featured excerpt from LiGa™ by Sanem Ozdural, the opening of chapter 1. If you’re hooked you can buy the eBook edition now (from any of the Amazon Kindle Stores, any of the Apple iTunes iBookstores, Kobobooks store, and elsewhere). If you want to wait for the paperback edition, it will be available from the 3rd of December.

Postcard From The Future #9

This month’s postcard from the future comes from an information technology technician…

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Everybody in the past thought we’d be building robots here in the future, didn’t they? Well, you got that kind of half right and half wrong I guess, all at once. Let me explain. There’s tons of robots alright, except that none of them look human. Dust-vacuuming robots for the home, grass-mowing and weeding robots for the garden, garbage robots for the street sweep-up. These guys are all just a foot and a half high by two feet long at most. They don’t have silly faces on them and they don’t talk back. Mostly they don’t talk at all, just get on with it. Continue reading “Postcard From The Future #9”

Postcard From The Future #8

This month’s postcard from the future comes from a 23rd century policeman…

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A message to the past, eh? Tell you what, I’ve always loved reading detective novels and I’m kind of envious of you guys back then with real crime and real criminals. All we get to do these days is fill out forms and liase with sociologists and behavioural psychologists. In fact, I had to get a degree to get this job. Surprised eh? Yeah, in theory I could still “beat the crap out of a punk” (God, I love that old 20th century noir cop patois), but I rarely get the chance these days. My history tutor used to tell me that all those old crime novels were “romanticised” and “escapist” but that strikes me as weird. What kind of screwed-up century were you living in where murder, robbery and rape seemed like escapism? Oh I know…. I’ve answered my own question. I enjoy reading that stuff now because I’m bored and there’s so little crime today, but come on guys, you had plenty of the real things, wars, famine, terrorism, plagues, riots… why did you have to make up shit too? Continue reading “Postcard From The Future #8”