“excellent in every possible way” – review of Dinnusos Rises on RisingShadow

Artwork: Alison Buck
Artwork: Alison Buck

On RisingShadow.net, Seregil of Rhiminee has just posted a marvellous review of Dinnusos Rises, the latest novel from Tej Turner. Although it is a sequel to his debut novel The Janus Cycle, it can also be read as a standalone novel. Seregil says he found The Janus Cycle captivating (“intriguing and insightful” was how he described it in his review) and he therefore had high expectations for Dinnusos Rises. In this review he writes that he is pleased to say that Dinnusos Rises met all of his expectations and “even managed to exceed them, because it’s just as rewarding and thought-provoking a reading experience as The Janus Cycle and then some”, adding that it is a “perfect companion” to The Janus Cycle.

Seregil describes Dinnusos Rises as “vibrant and intriguingly gritty”, saying that it is “one of the most fascinating novels of the year” with a “sophisticatedly complex story and colourful characters” which “will mesmerise readers who enjoy reading thought-provoking stories”.

He says it’s great that Tej “blends literary fiction with speculative fiction and spices the story with a touch of surrealism” to make a novel that takes readers on a “captivating and rewarding journey into a realistic yet surreal urban landscape where strange things happen and where reality meets fantasy in a powerful way”. Seregil compliments Tej’s characterisation as “excellent”, all of the characters are three-dimensional, have depth to them and each has a unique voice. He says that the characters “interact with each other in a believable way” and “nothing feels artificial or pretentious”. Using multiple viewpoints in a “vivid way” Tej “keeps the story fresh and interesting”.

Seregil says that Tej has a “genuine talent for writing stories that are spiced with gritty realism” exploring challenging themes in a realistic way while avoiding “melodramatic moments”; Tej counterbalances the harshness and grittiness with “moments of beauty and a few humorous elements”. Seregil says that one of the best things about the novel is that Tej “explores attraction, sex and different forms of sexuality in an admirably bold and realistic way”, and “dares to explore different kind of sexuality”.

In conclusion, Seregil describes Dinnusos Rises as a “prime example of what gifted authors are capable of achieving when they have courage to write about various themes and issues in a bold and insightful way”, and says it is “one of the best novels of the year” that “dares to be different and wonderfully showcases the diversity of the genre and its possibilities”. His summary is that Dinnusos Rises is “excellent in every possible way, because it’s a daring, thought-provoking and satisfyingly gritty novel”.

This was a very brief précis of Seregil’s review which you should read here.

 

“Attention to detail” – review of Dinnusos Rises by Sheri A. Wilkinson

Artwork: Alison Buck
Artwork: Alison Buck

On a number of review sites, including Library Thing, Sheri A. Wilkinson has just posted her review of Dinnusos Rises, the sequel to The Janus Cycle by Tej Turner. She noted that the use of a series of narrators, the main characters in the story, meant that she “got to feel what each was going through”. She also commented that “Attention to detail brings you deeper into the story”. She had not previously read The Janus Cycle (but is now going to). She says she enjoyed Dinnusos Rises and is sure that other readers will enjoy it too.

You can read Sheri’s review on Library Thing here.

 

“whole-hearted recommendation” – review of Dinnusos Rises on HumanitysDarkerSide

Artwork: Alison Buck
Artwork: Alison Buck

On her book blog HumanitysDarkerSide, Lise has written her review of Dinnusos Rises the new novel from Tej Turner. She had previously recommended The Janus Cycle when she reviewed it in 2015, so we were keen to read her review of Dinnusos Rises which follows many of the same characters. We weren’t disappointed, and nor was Lise. She starts by recommending reading the Janus Cycle first – the two books are standalone and can be read independently, but they have some common characters and the action of Dinnusos Rises takes place a few months after The Janus Cycle. After a little background to the book and how it follows on from The Janus Cycle, Lise highlights one of the main themes of the book, the rise of corporatocracy, as well as other significant issues such as friendship, trust, betrayal and love. She says that Dinnusos Rises is well-written with “fleshed-out characters” and “presents current issues in a package filled with action and adventure”. She concludes by saying that Dinnusos Rises has her “whole-hearted recommendation”. Thanks Lise.

You can read Lise’s full review on HumanitysDarkerSide here.

 

If someone believed you were a hero of legend, could you live up to it or would you walk away?

Tanya Reimer’s new novel tells how one unlikely man settling in the prairies of Saskatchewan in 1892 brings hope to the Ghost tribes and protects their Sacred Land

DARTFORD, KENT – 1 July 2016 – Elsewhen Press, an independent UK publisher specialising in Speculative Fiction, is delighted to announce the forthcoming publication of Legends on the Prairies, a Sacred Land Story by Canadian author Tanya Reimer. The prequel to her acclaimed debut novel Ghost on the Prairies, a Sacred Land Story, it tells the story of two people from different backgrounds and cultures who meet and bond over a common cause against a shared nemesis.

Artwork: Alison Buck
Artwork: Alison Buck

“Don’t you believe in legends?” Such a simple question, yet what Sacri really wants Alex to believe is that he is the hero from her legends. A hero meant to save land sacred to her tribe.

Alex is a lot of things. He’s a painter, a sculptor, and a dreamer. He has just been fired from a good job, grieves for a woman he hoped to marry, and is known as the local drunk. He’s terrified of fire, of losing his friend, and of being alone. He is a lot of things, but hero isn’t one of them.

Travelling across the country in 1892 to settle land on an unexplored part of the prairies, he hopes to find himself, to find a reason for his pitiful existence, and to have one last adventure with his dying friend. What he actually finds in the heart of the lonesome prairies is Sacri, defending land with her very soul. She believes he is the Man of Legends sent to save Sacred Land. Her determination entrances him. Despite himself, Alex finds himself praying to a God that he thought had abandoned him, in the hope that, just maybe, there is some truth to Sacri’s stories.

To add to Alex’s unease is the certainty that Sacri’s brother, often merely glimpsed as a silver shadow riding his horse across the horizon, will happily kill Alex if he turns out not to be the man that Sacri thinks he is.

Alternate history with paranormal and romantic elements, Legends on the Prairies, a Sacred Land Story is about growth, friendship, love, and the importance of believing in ourselves.

“This prequel doesn’t just add depth to the tale we already know,” says Peter Buck, Editorial Director of Elsewhen Press, “because, as well as providing some history for those characters, it gives us an insightful story about two people who are driven to fulfill a destiny they don’t necessarily understand or even fully believe. It’s a story about how the goodness in a person’s heart can overcome cultural division and social stigma, which is even more remarkable for having occurred in 1892. You don’t need to have read Ghosts on the Prairies to be charmed, moved and ultimately inspired by this book.”

Legends on the Prairies, a Sacred Land Story will be published in digital formats in August 2016 and in paperback in November 2016.

Notes for Editors

About Tanya Reimer

Tanya ReimerBorn and raised in Saskatchewan, Tanya enjoys using the tranquil prairies as a setting to her not-so-peaceful speculative fiction.

She is married with two children which means among her accomplishments are the necessary magical abilities to find a lost tooth in a park of sand and whisper away monsters from under the bed.

As director of a non-profit Francophone community center, Tanya offers programming and services in French for all ages to ensure the lasting imprint and growth of the Francophone community in which she was raised. What she enjoys the most about her job is teaching social media safety for teens and offering one-on-one technology classes for seniors.

Tanya was fifteen when she wrote her first column. She has a diploma in Journalism/Short Story Writing. Today, she actively submits to various newspapers, writes and publishes the local Francophone newsletter for her community, and maintains a blog at Life’s Like That. Legends on the Prairies, is her second Sacred Land Story for adults and the prequel to Ghosts on the Prairies, her debut novel.

 

Dodgy Bank Holiday weather predicted – Elsewhen Press to the rescue!

It’s a Bank Holiday weekend again and, as we head into it, the lovely weather we’ve had today (at least here around Elsewhen Towers) is not looking set to last. There’s a forecast of rain on Sunday and Monday. What a surprise.

But worry not! Elsewhen Press to the rescue! What better way to brighten up a dismal Bank Holiday than with a good book? And we have loads of good books for you to choose from. You don’t even have to brave the weather to get them as our books are available online on all the popular eBook platforms.

If you want science fiction, fantasy, epic fantasy, alternative history, a touch of the paranormal, time travel, dystopian futures, or even a good laugh we have a fantastic choice of titles for you. Look through the lists below…

(You might notice that some titles are in more than one list – not everything is easily classifiable!)

Science Fiction

Epic Fantasy

Fantasy

Alternative History

A Touch of the Paranormal

Time Travel

Dystopian Futures

Satire

Happy Bank Holiday – happy reading!

 

“brilliant gathering of short fiction” – review of Existence is Elsewhen in Aurealis magazine

Artwork by Alison Buck
Artwork by Alison Buck

In the latest issue (#90) of Aurealis magazine, Robbie Colburn has written a review of Existence is Elsewhen. Although Aurealis is primarily a magazine about Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy they recognise the global nature of SF; and, of course, the line-up of authors in Existence is Elsewhen is itself distinctly global. Sydney-based author Steve Harrison’s satirical Earthsale was one of the stories that Robbie liked, but he also singled out Tej Turner’s The Last Days, Stefan Jackson’s Luceria and Dave Weaver’s The Copy. He complimented the diversity of the stories included in what he described as a “generous bumper collection of speculative writing”.

Aurealis #90 available from www.aurealis.com.au

You should read all of Robbie’s review in issue #90 of Aurealis – and while you’re at it read the rest of the magazine too which also includes original short stories. You can get Aurealis here.

 

“deliciously dark and mesmerising” – review of Can’t Dream Without You on Risingshadow

Cover by Alison Buck inspired by MC Escher
Cover by Alison Buck inspired by MC Escher

On the Risingshadow website, Seregil of Rhiminee has just posted a review of Can’t Dream Without You by Tanya Reimer. Describing it as “refreshingly different”, he goes on to say that it’s “one of the best and most original paranormal novels I’ve read in quite a while”.

Seregil starts by outlining the story and main characters and pointing out that this is a “different kind of a story about darkness, dreams, love and survival”, with an “intense and dramatic atmosphere” enhanced by the Tanya’s skill as a writer. He then gives some background about the Whisperers, an essential part of the story, and says that although it includes these complex mythological elements the story “unfolds gradually and flows nicely towards the end”. He compliments Tanya on the way that she “seamlessly combines mythological and post-apocalyptic elements with contemporary elements and maintains an approriately mysterious and strange atmosphere throughout the story”.

Part of what makes the story work well is that the “characterisation feels convincing” and the “narrative shifts fluently” between the main characters, each of which have “their own feelings, thoughts and motives, and readers get to know them during the story”. He especially liked the way that Tanya writes about the nuanced relationships between her characters.

One of the highlights of Can’t Dream Without You, says Seregil “is that Tanya Reimer has created an interesting Dreamland and writes fluently about dreams” adding “I’ve seldom read novels that feature dreams in such a powerful and enchanting way”.

He concludes by saying that “Tanya Reimer is an author to watch, because her novels and stories are good and she manages to surprise readers with fresh ideas” and “has a gift for writing original and thought-provoking stories”. He thinks that Can’t Dream Without You is “exactly what a contemporary and paranormal speculative fiction novel should be… different, exciting and interesting, and that’s why it deserves to be read”. His final remarks: “Captivating and fluently written entertainment for adults!”

You can read Seregil’s full review on Risingshadow here.

 

Existence is Elsewhen launch at Mancunicon

Artwork by Alison Buck
Artwork by Alison Buck

Over the Easter weekend, the Manchester Hilton Deansgate was taken over by Eastercon (known this year as Mancunicon). Among the various panels and events was our launch of Existence is Elsewhen. Of the twenty authors of stories in this (excellent and wonderfully imaginative) anthology, nine were at Mancunicon, along with Alison who designed the cover and the fleurons inside the book. We held a launch party in the Presidential Suite on the 22nd floor.



View from 22nd floor at launch of Existence is Elsewhen just before sunset
View from 22nd floor at launch of Existence is Elsewhen just before sunset

We were supposed to start at sunset, but got underway a little late – but we still had good views out over the city. Each of the authors present read a short extract from their own story – just enough to whet the appetite of the audience who were very attentive, in spite of (or perhaps thanks to) the wine and beer that was also being consumed. And of course there were flying saucers to be eaten as well as small chocolate eggs.

View from the 22nd floor at the Launch of Existence is Elsewhen after sunset
View from the 22nd floor at the Launch of Existence is Elsewhen after sunset


Pete started with an introduction and then read Christopher Nuttall’s extract from The Girl in Black for him, as Christopher was busy soothing his one-year old who had just decided he didn’t like the room being so full.

Pete reading from Christopher Nuttall's The Girl in Black at the Existence is Elsewhen launch (while Christopher was busy trying to soothe his one-year old son outside the room!)
Pete reading from Christopher Nuttall’s The Girl in Black at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
(while Christopher was busy trying to soothe his one-year old son outside the room!)


Siobhan McVeigh read from her story Face the Music:

Siobhan McVeigh reading from Face the Music at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Siobhan McVeigh reading from Face the Music at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Susan Oke read from her story Hide and Hunt:

Susan Oke reading from Hide and Hunt at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Susan Oke reading from Hide and Hunt at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Peter R. Ellis read from his story In the bleak Long Winter:

Peter R. Ellis reading from In the bleak Long Winter at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Peter R. Ellis reading from In the bleak Long Winter at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Dave Weaver read from his story The Copy:

Dave Weaver reading from The Copy at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Dave Weaver reading from The Copy at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


J.A. Christy read from her story Inside and Out™ V.5:

J.A. Christy reading from Inside and Out™ V.5 at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
J.A. Christy reading from Inside and Out™ V.5 at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Tej Turner read from his story The Last Days:

Tej Turner reading from The Last Days at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Tej Turner reading from The Last Days at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Edwin Hayward read from his story Ambrosia:

Edwin Hayward reading from Ambrosia at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Edwin Hayward reading from Ambrosia at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Andy McKell read from his story Homo Sapiens Inferior:

Andy McKell reading from Homo Sapiens Inferior at the Existence is Elsewhen launch
Andy McKell reading from Homo Sapiens Inferior at the Existence is Elsewhen launch


Everybody had a good time, authors and audience alike. It was a very pleasant start to Saturday evening!

 

“gripping and entertaining” – Review of Unity of Seven on Risingshadow

Artwork: Alison Buck
Artwork: Alison Buck

On Risingshadow.net, Seregil of Rhiminee has just reviewed Peter R. EllisUnity of Seven, the final volume in the Evil Above the Stars trilogy. Having previously read and enjoyed the first two volumes Seventh Child and The Power of Seven (which he also reviewed, see here and here) Seregil was very pleased to read Unity of Seven which he describes as “a fantastic final entry” in this “intriguingly different and compelling fantasy trilogy”.

Seregil admits that he is hard to please when it comes to YA fantasy because too many are clichéd and concentrate on annoying elements of paranormal romance; fortunately, he says, Peter R. Ellis has had the “courage to step out of the comfort zone that so many YA fantasy authors occupy and has created a story that feels fresh and exciting due to its Celtic and ancient elements that have nothing in common with teenaged girls falling in love with vampires, werewolves and shapeshifters.” He adds that Peter “writes classic epic YA fantasy in a modern and entertaining way” and that Unity of Seven is a modern fantasy novel yet it “has an old-fashioned charm to it that is lacking from many new YA fantasy novels”.

Another reason why he enjoyed this novel, Seregil says, is Peter’s “ability to write intriguingly about the Omniverse and elements related to time travel” in an “informative, but not too scientific a way so that readers will easily comprehend what he’s writing about”. These elements of science fiction are “charming, because you don’t normally find anything like this in modern YA fantasy”. In fact, Seregil says, Unity of Seven has “a good dash of imagination and originality”, because Peter “blends YA fiction, fantasy, science fiction, cosmology and Celtic elements in a satisfyingly unique and complex way”.

Seregil commends Peter’s writing style, which is “gripping and entertaining” and “delightfully vivid”, and says that it “will please YA readers, because it’s accessible and easy to read” and because Peter “writes well about things that concern his target audience”. The book is “delightfully different and original” and manages to “combine different elements in a fascinating way” to create “a good story” that is “an original vision of battle between good and evil, seen through the eyes of a teenaged girl”. He goes on to say “September is an interesting and realistic protagonist, because she’s not your normal kind of a beautiful heroine who charms everybody with her looks and falls in love with a charming hero or prince. She’s an actual human being who is a normal person with her own problems”.

Seregil concludes by recommending Unity of Seven to “young adult readers and adult readers alike” because it will charm both readerships with its “genuinely intriguing story and well-created protagonist”, a “different kind of a YA story” that will fascinate readers of all ages.

 

The Dark Chronicles – banished immortals and their struggle to return to heaven

Elsewhen Press publishes Can’t Dream Without You, the first of The Dark Chronicles from rising star of Canadian speculative fiction, Tanya Reimer.

DARTFORD, KENT – 8 January 2016 – Elsewhen Press, an independent UK publisher specialising in Speculative Fiction, is delighted to announce the publication today of Can’t Dream Without You by Canadian author Tanya Reimer, the first of her tales from The Dark Chronicles.

Cover by Alison Buck inspired by MC Escher
Cover by Alison Buck inspired by MC Escher

Legends say that, tens of thousands of years ago, Whisperers were banished from the heavens, torn in half, and dumped on a mortal realm that they didn’t understand. Longing for their other halves, they went from being powerful immortals to lonely leeches relying on humans to survive. Over the years, they earnt magic from demons, they left themselves Notebooks with hints, and by pairing up with human souls, they eventually found their other halves. Humbled by their experiences, they discovered the true purpose of life and many were worthy of returning to the heavens. But many were not.

The Dark Chronicles are stories that share the heartache of select unworthy Whisperers on their journey back to immortality after The War of 2019. Can’t Dream Without You is one such story, in which we meet Steve and Julia. Steve isn’t a normal boy. He plays with demons, his soul travels to a dream realm at night using mystical butterflies, and soon he’ll earn the power to raise the dead. Al thinks that destroying him would do the world a favour, yet he just can’t kill his own son. Wanting to acquire the power that raises the dead before Steve does, Al performs a ritual on Steve’s sixteenth birthday. He transfers Steve’s dark magic to Julia, an innocent girl he plans to kill. But Steve is determined to save Julia and sucks her soul to Dreamland. From the dream world, he invokes the help of her brother to keep her safe.

Five years later, Steve can’t tell what’s real or what’s a nightmare. Julia’s brother wants to kill him, a strange bald eagle is erasing memories, and Steve’s caught in some bizarre bullfight on another realm with a cop hot on his trail looking to be Julia’s hero. All the while, Steve and Julia must fight the desperate need to make their steamy dreams a reality.

Can’t Dream Without You is published in digital editions today by Elsewhen Press. It will be published in a print edition in April.

Notes for Editors

About Tanya Reimer

Tanya ReimerBorn and raised in Saskatchewan, Tanya enjoys using the tranquil prairies as a setting to her not-so-peaceful speculative fiction. She is married with two children which means among her accomplishments are the necessary magical abilities to find a lost tooth in a park of sand and whisper away monsters from under the bed. As director of a non-profit Francophone community center, Tanya offers programming and services in French for all ages to ensure the lasting imprint and growth of the Francophone community in which she was raised. What she enjoys the most about her job is teaching social media safety for teens and offering one-on-one technology classes for seniors.

Tanya was fifteen when she wrote her first column. She has a diploma in Journalism/Short Story Writing. Today, she actively submits to various newspapers, writes and publishes the local Francophone newsletter for her community, and maintains a blog at Life’s Like That. In 2014 her debut novel Ghosts on the Prairies a Sacred Land story for adults was published by Elsewhen Press, followed by Petrified a young adult Whispering novel, from Sunbury Press.