“brimming with ideas” – review of Entanglement on Warpcore SF

Entanglement cover (click for more details)Ros Jackson reviewed Entanglement by Douglas Thompson on Warpcore SF.  She says there’s “something very Golden Age” about it, capturing “that sense of wide-eyed wonder and endless possibilities”.  As the astronauts (or, in the terminology of the story, duplinauts) make first contact on a variety of new worlds the aliens are “breathtakingly weird”, and the stories are a “philosophical examination” of different ways of life.  She is concerned that many of the astronauts meet “creatively horrible fates”.  However she says “all of the strangeness makes sense by the end” and she concludes by describing the tone of the story as one of “bizarreness, wonder, and occasional viciousness”.

You can read Ros’ full review here.

 

Postcard From The Future #10

Our final postcard from the future comes from Professor Saul Deveraux himself, inventor of the Retro-Temporal acceleration technology being deployed at Geneva’s ‘Even Larger Hadron Collider’ to send messages back in time…

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I hope you’ve enjoyed the previous nine messages over the last nine months. The same time as the gestation of a human child, perhaps not coincidentally. You see, the Retro-Temporal Postcard Program is very much my baby, my lifetime’s work, albeit so well assisted by thousands of other dedicated scientists, the world over. I thank them all.

Will you people of the early twenty-first century believe that these messages are real? –That we in the 23rd century, really have mastered such incredible technology as to be able to send information back in time to you? As I write, there is no evidence in any of our libraries or history annals that these attempts were successful. But I confidently expect to go to the same data sources tomorrow and find that history has updated itself. Of course it will. But will I know? This paper I write on would have to disappear into thin air, in order for me not to know, and that seems unlikely. So history is going to change and we’re going to see it change, almost instantly before our eyes. How extraordinary. That has never happened before in the history of our planet. Or has it? You see the irony? Continue reading “Postcard From The Future #10”

“A memorable book”, review of Entanglement on Science Fiction & Fantasy blog

Entanglement cover (click for more details)In his review of Douglas Thompson’s novel Entanglement, on the SFF Blog, Tony Williams describes the basic premise of the book but follows it by saying “As can be expected from this author, this is far more than a routine humans-meet-aliens story.” As he subsequently writes, “Like all of Thompson’s writing, strong and sometimes disturbing images are created in the mind.” You can read Tony’s review in full here.

Postcard From The Future #9

This month’s postcard from the future comes from an information technology technician…

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Everybody in the past thought we’d be building robots here in the future, didn’t they? Well, you got that kind of half right and half wrong I guess, all at once. Let me explain. There’s tons of robots alright, except that none of them look human. Dust-vacuuming robots for the home, grass-mowing and weeding robots for the garden, garbage robots for the street sweep-up. These guys are all just a foot and a half high by two feet long at most. They don’t have silly faces on them and they don’t talk back. Mostly they don’t talk at all, just get on with it. Continue reading “Postcard From The Future #9”

Postcard From The Future #8

This month’s postcard from the future comes from a 23rd century policeman…

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A message to the past, eh? Tell you what, I’ve always loved reading detective novels and I’m kind of envious of you guys back then with real crime and real criminals. All we get to do these days is fill out forms and liase with sociologists and behavioural psychologists. In fact, I had to get a degree to get this job. Surprised eh? Yeah, in theory I could still “beat the crap out of a punk” (God, I love that old 20th century noir cop patois), but I rarely get the chance these days. My history tutor used to tell me that all those old crime novels were “romanticised” and “escapist” but that strikes me as weird. What kind of screwed-up century were you living in where murder, robbery and rape seemed like escapism? Oh I know…. I’ve answered my own question. I enjoy reading that stuff now because I’m bored and there’s so little crime today, but come on guys, you had plenty of the real things, wars, famine, terrorism, plagues, riots… why did you have to make up shit too? Continue reading “Postcard From The Future #8”

“ one of the most fascinating science fiction novels I’ve read” – Review of Entanglement on Rising Shadows

Entanglement cover (click for more details)On the Rising Shadows website, Seregil of Rhiminee has written a long and enthusiastic review of  Douglas Thompson’s Entanglement. He describes it as “excellent and fascinating” and believes that Entanglement is Douglas’ “best novel so far”.

He goes on to say: “In my opinion Douglas Thompson is a talented science fiction author. What separates him from other authors is that he’s clearly more willing to take risks than several other authors and isn’t afraid to explore difficult subjects. In other words, he’s willing to write about unconventional things.

You can read the full review here.

Douglas Thompson, author of Entanglement, at FantasyCon 2012

Douglas Thompson, author of Entanglement, will be at FantasyCon 2012 at the Royal Albion Hotel, Brighton, 27-30 September 2012. Look for him in the Dealers’ Room at the Eibonvale Press table.

Entanglement by Douglas Thompson published today as eBook

Entanglement cover (click for more details)Entanglement by Douglas Thompson is available from today as an eBook in all 32 iTunes Stores and in all 6 Amazon Kindle Stores (UK, US, DE, ES, FR, IT) for £2.99 / $3.99 / €3.49.

In 2180, travel to neighbouring star systems has been mastered thanks to quantum teleportation using the ‘entanglement’ of sub-atomic matter; astronauts on earth can be duplicated on a remote world once the dupliport chamber has arrived there. In this way a variety of worlds can be explored, but what humanity discovers is both surprising and disturbing, enlightening and shocking. Each alternative to mankind that the astronauts find, sheds light on human shortcomings and potential while offering fresh perspectives of life on Earth. Meanwhile, at home, the lives of the astronauts and those in charge of the missions will never be the same again.

Best described as philosophical science fiction, Entanglement explores our assumptions about such constants as death, birth, sex and conflict, as the characters in the story explore distant worlds and the intelligent life that lives there. It is simultaneously a novel and a series of short stories: multiple worlds, each explored in a separate chapter, a separate story; every one another step on mankind’s journey outwards to the stars and inwards to our own psyche. Yet the whole is much greater than the sum of the parts; the synergy of the episodes results in an overarching story arc that ultimately tells us more about ourselves than about the rest of the universe.


Douglas Thompson’s short stories have appeared in a wide range of magazines and anthologies, most recently Albedo One, Ambit, Postscripts, and New Writing Scotland. He won the Grolsch/Herald Question of Style Award in 1989 and second prize in the Neil Gunn Writing Competition in 2007. His first book, Ultrameta, was published in August 2009, nominated for the Edge Hill Prize, and shortlisted for the BFS Best Newcomer Award. His critically acclaimed second novel, Sylvow, was published in autumn 2010. Two more novels Apoidea and Mechagnosis were published earlier this year.  Entanglement is the first of Douglas’  novels to be published by Elsewhen Press.

Exciting start to the year for Elsewhen Press

This is turning out to be an exciting time here at Elsewhen Press. We’re only one month into 2012 and we’ve already signed up two new authors, an American professor and an award-winning Scottish author.

The former, David Colón, has written an interesting work of literary speculative fiction, his first novel The Lost Men, an allegory set in a near-future where most of the world’s population have gone and the few remaining survivors are guided by perceived Fate.  It is a novel that raises interesting questions about the human condition and personal responsibility.  The Lost Men will be published this Spring.

The latter, Douglas Thompson, has written an intriguing novel, Entanglement, which he calls philosophical science fiction.  The story starts in 2180 when travel to neighbouring star systems has been mastered by the use of quantum teleportation, ‘entanglement’ of sub-atomic matter. In the course of the novel, 24 worlds are explored; what humanity discovers is both surprising and disturbing, enlightening and shocking.  Entanglement will be published this Summer.

Meanwhile our first title [Re]Awakenings continues to sell as an eBook and will soon be released as a paperback.  Our second title, Queens of Antares: Bloodline returned will be published early in February.

Phew!

Elsewhen Press signs award-winning Scottish author

We are delighted to announce that award-winning Scottish author, Douglas Thompson, has signed a publishing deal with Elsewhen Press for his next science fiction novel, Entanglement. Described as philosophical science fiction, Entanglement explores our assumptions about such constants as death, birth, sex and conflict, as the characters in the story explore distant worlds and the intelligent life that lives there.

Entanglement starts in 2180 when travel to neighbouring star systems has been mastered by the use of quantum teleportation, ‘entanglement’ of sub-atomic matter. In the course of the novel, 24 worlds are explored; what humanity discovers is both surprising and disturbing, enlightening and shocking. Each alternative to mankind that they find, sheds light on human shortcomings and potential and offers fresh perspectives on life on Earth. Meanwhile personal human dramas play out at home for the astronauts and those in charge of the missions.

Entanglement will be published in a digital edition this summer and in a print edition in the autumn.